Myanmar (Burma)Travel Guide

December 27, 2016 - Comment

Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a Southeast Asian nation of more than 100 ethnic groups, bordering India, Bangladesh, China, Laos and Thailand. Yangon (formerly Rangoon), the country’s largest city, is home to bustling markets, numerous parks and lakes, and the towering, gilded Shwedagon Pagoda, which contains Buddhist relics and dates to the 6th century. Other important

Myanmar (formerly Burma) is a Southeast Asian nation of more than 100 ethnic groups, bordering India, Bangladesh, China, Laos and Thailand. Yangon (formerly Rangoon), the country’s largest city, is home to bustling markets, numerous parks and lakes, and the towering, gilded Shwedagon Pagoda, which contains Buddhist relics and dates to the 6th century.

Other important Buddhist sites include the ancient city of Bagan, studded with more than 2,000 temples and pagodas, and Kyaiktiyo Pagoda, perched atop a rock at the edge of a steep hillside. Cruises along Burma’s Irrawaddy River take in historic landmarks, such as the 19th-century Mandalay Palace, and rural scenery. Visitors in motorboats and fishermen propelling skiffs cross Inle Lake, which is lined with villages on stilts and colorful markets. Along Burma’s Bay of Bengal coast, Ngapali is a palm-lined, upscale beach resort area.

 
Shwedagon Pagoda – The Shwedagon Pagoda, officially named Shwedagon Zedi Daw and also known as the Great Dagon Pagoda and the Golden Pagoda, is a gilded stupa located in Yangon, Myanmar. The 99-metre-tall (325 ft) pagoda is situated on Singuttara Hill, to the west of Kandawgyi Lake, and dominates the Yangon skyline.

Shwenandaw Monastery (Burmese: ရွှေနန်းတော်ကျောင်း; MLCTS: hrwe. nan: taw kyaung:, IPA: [ʃwènándɔ̀ tʃáun]; lit. “Golden Palace Monastery”) is a historic Buddhist monastery located near Mandalay Hill, Mandalay Region, Myanmar (formerly Burma).

Shwenandaw Monastery was built in 1880 by King Thibaw Min, who dismantled and relocated the apartment formerly occupied by his father, King Mindon Min, just before Mindon Min’s death, at a cost of 120,000 rupees.[1] Thibaw removed the building in October 1878, believing it to be haunted by his father’s spirit.[2] The building was reconstructed as a monastery over the course of 5 years, dedicated in memory of his father, on a plot adjoining Atumashi Monastery.

The building was originally part of the royal palace at Amarapura, before it was moved to Mandalay, where it formed the northern section of the Hmannan (Glass Palace) and part of the king’s royal apartments.[2] The building was heavily gilt with gold and adorned with glass mosaic work.

The monastery is known for its teak carvings of Buddhist myths, which adorn its walls and roofs. The monastery is built in the traditional Burmese architectural style. Shwenandaw Monastery is the single remaining major original structure of the original Royal Palace today.

The Ananda Temple (Burmese: အာနန္ဒာဘုရား, pronounced: [ànàɴdà pʰəjá]), located in Bagan, Myanmar is a Buddhist temple built in 1105 AD during the reign (1084–1113) of King Kyanzittha of the Pagan Dynasty. It is one of four surviving temples in Bagan. The temple layout is in a cruciform with several terraces leading to a small pagoda at the top covered by an umbrella known as hti, which is the name of the umbrella or top ornament found in almost all pagodas in Myanmar. The Buddhist temple houses four standing Buddhas, each one facing the cardinal direction of East, North, West and South. The temple is said to be an architectural wonder in a fusion of Mon and adopted Indian style of architecture. The impressive temple has also been titled the “Westminster Abbey of Burma”. The temple has close similarity to the Pathothamya temple of the 10th–11th century, and is also known as “veritable museum of stones”.

Mandalay Hill (Burmese: မန္တလေးတောင်; MLCTS: manta. le: taung [màɴdəlé tàʊɴ]) is a 240 metres (790 ft) hill that is located to the northeast of the city center of Mandalay in Burma. The city took its name from the hill. Mandalay Hill is known for its abundance of pagodas and monasteries, and has been a major pilgrimage site for Burmese Buddhists for nearly two centuries. At the top of the hill is the Sutaungpyei (literally wish-fulfilling) Pagoda. A panoramic view of Mandalay from the top of Mandalay Hill alone makes it worthwhile to attempt a climb up its stairways. There are four covered stairways called saungdan leading up the hill from the south, southeast, west and north, and convenient seats of masonry work line these stairways all the way up. A one-way motor road today saves time and also makes it accessible for those who are unable to climb up the stairs, leading to an escalator and a lift to the pagoda at the summit.

Comments

Comments are disabled for this post.