Jacket Dilemma for Onebag Eurotrip in Late Nov.

September 8, 2017 - Comment

The One Bag Traveler recommends Gear, Destinations and Adventures. [x-posted to malefashionadvice and onebagging] So, I’m going semi-backpacking to Dublin, Prague, and Budapest in late November. That’s pretty much early winter. Because I’m a bit of a freak when it comes to planning, I’m already debating what to pack and how to minimize as much

The One Bag Traveler recommends Gear, Destinations and Adventures.

[x-posted to malefashionadvice and onebagging]

So, I’m going semi-backpacking to Dublin, Prague, and Budapest in late November. That’s pretty much early winter. Because I’m a bit of a freak when it comes to planning, I’m already debating what to pack and how to minimize as much as possible. (I am currently planning to bring my Minaal 2.0 and a daypack)

My goal is to pack only what I need and not more, to reduce as much strain on my back and shoulders as I can. At the same time, I don’t want to regret not packing something that would’ve come in handy, and then have to buy or otherwise have a tougher time than if I’d just brought it. I don’t want to regret my decisions after I’m on the plane!

I have three jackets that I am considering. I own all of them but can only take one.

  1. Fjallraven Greenland No. 1 Jacket (Special Edition)
  2. Norse Projects Lindisfarne Classic
  3. Barbour Bedale

1. Fjrallraven Greenland No. 1 Jacket (Special Edition)

A Fjallraven classic from 1968, the Greenland No. 1 is a long light padded parka made with G-1000 Eco. The parka features 2 bellow chest pockets and leather details.

Fjällräven’s most classic jacket, here in its original design after founder Åke Nordin sewed the first jacket using a durable tent fabric at home in Örnsköldsvik in 1968. This simple early version was created for climbers and has two breast pockets. (The side pockets on the Greenland Jacket were added in a later version after the jacket grew in popularity among a wider outdoor public in the 1970s.) Fixed hood, zipper with flap in the front and buttoned adjustments in the sleeve cuffs. The fabric is the durable, wind and water resistant G-1000 Eco that breathes well and can be infused with wax for extra protection from the wind and rain.

Pros: This one is probably the lightest one, so high marks for portability. It’s also warm and large enough on my frame that I can layer underneath. It has a fixed hood, which is comfortable but not adjustable.

I used to wear this as my winter jacket in New England, and it was definitely warm enough. I usually wore it over a sweatshirt and a tee-shirt, so I could probably replicate this easily with an additional layer or two in Europe.

I like the color and construction of this jacket a lot. Out of these three jackets, this one is definitely what I would consider the most “activewear”. It’s what I wear when I go skiing, because the hood can fit over a helmet alright and it’s both durable and light. I like how the cuffs on the arms allow for gloves.

Cons: My concerns with this one are that its pockets aren’t amazing for travel. There are two hand pockets, that can be secured with a button

However, this means that things of importance shouldn’t be put in those pockets because you can’t really close them, and they’re also at an angle and not particularly deep. I don’t like putting stuff in the front chest pockets because that looks very strange and also will interfere with the chest strap on my backpack.

That leaves one sort of zip-pocket on the inside, that is only attached at one end to the jacket itself. A passport would be perfect for it, but unfortunately I need more than just that on my body the entire trip.

I will need:

  1. Passport
  2. Wallet with Cash / Cards
  3. Coin Pouch (important for Europe, because significant $ are in coin-form).
  4. Phone
  5. Notebook
  6. Pen

Because that inner pocket is unattached at the bottom and sides, it’ll also probably flap a bit from the weight. Finally, this jacket is also probably the least aesthetically pleasing one, although I do mean that relatively.

2. Norse Projects – Lindisfarne Classic

A classic parka jacket, updated with modern technology and a contemporary fit. Constructed from authentic waxed cotton produced by Halley Stevensons of Scotland. This parka is lined with Italian shearling wool and is insulated with water resistant Primaloft to ensure warmth without bulk.

This fabric possesses a natural patina as a result of its manufacturing process and coating, which will develop through wear and washing. This is an inherent property of the fabric and will create a more personal piece over time.

Pros: This is an extremely well crafted jacket, and I’m a huge sucker for patina, so that sold me right off the bat. I also purchased mine from Grailed for $330. Original price for this is $580! I love a good deal.

The hood is adjustable. The pockets are DEEP and angled on the outside, which is great for carrying maps and putting things I’m okay with losing in. For the security stuff that I want close to me at all times, there are two inner pockets, both suitable for my purpose.

Cons: I’ve never yet worn this in cold weather, so it’s untested. It feels very warm, but also very heavy, which means it’s not that portable. I’ve tried it on a few times, and I like how it fits, but am worried about the extra heft.

It’s also much closer to my body than the Fjallraven jacket. I think if I wore this, I’d…

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